Art against tyranny. Activist doused with greenery

Source: “Doxa” and “Meduza”


Activist Pavel Krisevich was attacked by two unidentified persons at a railway station.
“Two came up while I was walking to the Tverskoy station. They said that I had offended their faith with my action and demanded to apologize for it on my knees. When I sent them, they sprinkled greenery in my face,” Krisevich said.


Why?
On the evening of November 5, a rally in support of political prisoners was held near the FSB building on Lubyanka. One of its participants, Pavel Krisevich, was “crucified” on the cross in the image of Jesus Christ. Four more activists in raincoats with the inscription “FSB” set it on fire and started throwing volumes of “criminal cases” into the fire. Krisevich was detained by police, on November 6 he was arrested for 15 days.
Other activists helped him to carry out the action on Lubyanka. Four of them were supposed to symbolize the horsemen of the apocalypse: their role was to go out to the square in cloaks with the inscription “FSB”, set fire and throw volumes of “criminal cases” into the fire. They also needed “patrols”: they had to watch that the police did not appear on the spot ahead of time.
Krisevich also wrote a manifest of the action, which, however, was not published. Anastasia Mikhailova quoted several lines from the manifesto: “On the volumes of fabricated cases we do not put a cross, but a crucifix. We stand for the release of all political prisoners in Russia, for the complete and hopeless destruction of the archives of political persecution in the country and the institution of repression in general. And we support the liberation of art. “
In the evening, a rented minivan drove up to the square. “Everyone comes out from there, pulls out the cross, Krisevich comes out naked in a bandage, guys with FSB cloaks. I see two security personnel coming out of the building. Thought it was a big problem, but they didn’t pay attention to us. And the police officers also ignored us, went into the paddy wagon to warm up.”
The activists put up a cross, hung Krisevich on him (his hands were tied to the crossbar) in a loincloth and a wreath of thorns made of barbed wire. Four activists scattered thick folders around the cross symbolizing the criminal cases of political prisoners. The names of the killed oppositionists, unofficial names of cases motivated by political persecution were written on them.
The cross and the books were doused with a substance that burns at 40 degrees (‘C) and does not burn a person. 10 seconds after the fire appeared and Krisevich shouted “Down with the police state!” and “Freedom for political prisoners!”, the police paid attention to what was happening. “They went out, looked and then only reacted. “Damn, some dude on the cross, there is fire all around!” They started to run: someone across the road, someone through an underground passage,” said the person, who was filming the action at the time.

When the police approached the cross, all the activists, except for the tied Krisevich, had already fled. However, Krisevich himself did not really want to get to the police department too: his hands were not specially fixed on the cross very much. “But when you are on the cross in the middle of burning cases, and a policeman comes up to you with the words “Why are you hanging here?” I answer him: “I am tied, I cannot.” And then the rest of the police flew in and removed [me from the cross], breaking the strings. You can’t escape.”
In total, Krisevich hung on the cross for three to five minutes, after which the police took him off and carried him to the paddy wagon. One of the policemen took out a fire extinguisher and put out the remnants of the burning “criminal cases.” While Krisevich was sitting in the paddy wagon, the head of the police squad on Lubyanskaya Square visited him. According to the activist, he “threw in the face” of Krisevich the “criminal cases” that did not burn out. “He [the police officer] realized that he was going to be punished very seriously, he was very offended, he grumbled, called him a beast, and then just hit him in the face with all his might,” the activist says.
Half an hour after the arrest, the janitors were already sweeping the sidewalk and washing the venue with shampoo. At that time Krisevich was taken to the department. A lawyer came to him, and friends handed the activist food and clothes. Krisevich spent the night in the department: a protocol was drawn up against him on the repeated violation of the procedure for holding mass actions. At the same time, Krisevich was taken to the emergency room so that he could fix the trail from the blow of the policeman on the Lubyanka.
The lawyer noted that on the evening of November 5, the police officers had no complaints against the activist. The activist himself also says that he did not resist: “I was simply taken off the cross and dragged into the paddy wagon.” Nevertheless, the Tverskoy District Court of Moscow found Pavel Krisevich guilty and arrested the activist for 15 days.
Krisevich said that he was satisfied with the way the action went. The activist Anastasia Mikhailova, who helps him conduct the performances, confirms that the performance went exactly as planned: “As Pasha saw it, he did it for sure. The main thing is to convey the idea, and we managed to do it ”.
Activist Pavel Krisevich lives in St. Petersburg and is not the first time for him to hold performances dedicated to political prisoners. He imitated hanging on the Troitsky bridge, near the courthouse in Moscow he made a “sacrifice” to the court. And in June he lit a fire and chained himself to the fence at the court. Krisevich was fined, and after the action on Troitsky Bridge he was arrested under the article on hooliganism.

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